Dodson defects to synchronized swimming team, nation has high hopes for 2016 Olymipics

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By Jake Loel

Aquatic Mammal Enthusiast

It was one small step for synchronized swimming, one giant step for Americans once Nicholas Dodson announced his decision to join the Pirouettes of Texas synchronized swim team. - Photo courtesy of PTXSYNCHRO
It was one small step for synchronized swimming, one giant step for Americans once Nicholas Dodson announced his decision to join the Pirouettes of Texas synchronized swim team.
– Photo courtesy of PTXSYNCHRO

Sophomore sprinter Nicholas Dodson has left the University of Dallas Swim Club community. The organization received the announcement that he will no longer be competing for the club with shock. On Monday, he began practice with the local synchronized swim team, the Pirouettes of Texas, which practices at the same natatorium as the UD Swim Club.

Synchronized swimming is an Olympic sport that involves a synchronized dance routine, complete with music, in the water. It is considered by The University News sports analyst Joe Hanretty to be “the least manly sport in the world.”

However, that does not seem to bother the graceful Dodson.

The epitome of grace, Dodson will begin practice as soon as he turns in his Literary Traditions IV essay. - Photo by Joe Flynn
The epitome of grace, Dodson will begin practice as soon as he turns in his Literary Traditions IV essay.
– Photo by Joe Flynn

“I’ve always loved the water, and I’ve always loved performing dance routines; this seems like a perfect chance for me to explore my two passions more deeply,” Dodson said.

The Pirouettes’ head coach, Shelley O’Neal, is ecstatic about the addition.

“Nick is the missing piece to our routines. He has the natural talent to be among the best,” O’Neal said.

O’Neal further complimented her newest protégé by praising his “rhythm”, his “sprightliness” and the general “grandeur of how he presents himself each day, both in and out of the water”.

Nick is currently practicing with the synchronized swimming athletes on a dance to Bach’s “Violin Concerto in A minor.” Although he is enjoying working on his first “synchro” (as the sport is sometimes called) routine, he said in an interview that he is excited to move on to different music genres.

“[I] just can’t wait to get into the pop-y stuff. Coach has a really exciting lineup for us, including tracks from Beyoncé and Rihanna,” Dodson said.

Not everyone is quite so excited about Dodson’s sudden departure from the UD Swim Club.

“I’m terribly upset with Nick’s decision to leave,” UD Swim Club President Hank Walter said. “He is a huge asset to our club, and we will no longer have a men’s relay to compete in the championships come April.”

Dodson said he hopes to give synchronized swimming lessons through Rec Sports when the campus pool opens up. He encourages all prospective swimmers to begin the difficult stretching routines and the rigorous breathing control work that are required of the sport as soon as possible. As far as his future with synchro goes, Dodson is unsure. Unfortunately, men’s synchro is not yet a nationally recognized sport by any country in the world, but the United States is working on changing that because of the talent Dodson shows.

“He’s just THAT good,” President Barack Obama said Monday night after seeing footage of the agile Dodson make leaps and pirouettes through the pool. “I’m working day and night to change the stigma against male synchro athletes, and we should have it being approved by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) by the next summer games.”

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