Drawing the Line Somewhere: Accessibility of Art

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Linda Smith, A&E Editor

 

 

I have always been of the mind that art can be done and appreciated by anyone, but only when it is available for everyone does it actually mean anything. Just seeing the gleaming grandeur that is “The Traveling Man” throughout Deep Ellum inspires me to go out and seek art for myself.

And in a city like Dallas, it is not hard to do. According to visitdallas.com, the Dallas Arts District boasts the largest arts district in the nation, covering 68 acres and 19 contiguous blocks. Even the buildings are something to celebrate; the Pritzker Prize, an architecture prize given to architects who combine talent, vision and commitment in their works, has been given to four architects who worked on this expansive project. It was a 30-year plan that has come to fruition with its impressive collection of museums, performance halls, residences, churches, restaurants, offices and even a school.

One of “The Traveling Man” sculptures, which not only makes a unique  addition to Dallas, but also serves as inspiration to seek out creativity. -Photo courtesy of robots.net
One of “The Traveling Man” sculptures, which not only makes a unique addition to Dallas, but also serves as inspiration to seek out creativity.
-Photo courtesy of robots.net

What does all this mean, though, unless everyone can appreciate it? I believe that Dallas has not only fully considered that question, but has taken great strides toward making its art presence a reality for everyone.

The Dallas Museum of Art offers free general admission, and most temporary exhibitions are also free, or available to the public at a nominal price. The Crow Collection of Asian Art is also free, and is currently undergoing renovations to expand its collection even more. The Nasher Sculpture Center offers free admission the first Saturday of every month, and is constantly hosting “’til Midnight at the Nasher” events that bring families out for an evening of art, movies and food. The Meyerson Symphony Center and Winspear Opera House not only make lovely music for the area, but also offer several chances to bring the community together through performances at local venues. This includes the symphony’s upcoming AT&T Gala, which will be simulcast for free at Klyde Warren Park beginning at 8:45 p.m. on Sept. 13.

Marc Chagall once said, “Great art picks up where nature ends.” I see no greater proof of this than in the Dallas Arts District, which will always continue to grow and offer more with every visit. I challenge anyone reading this to be Traveling Men and use any opportunity you have to always seek out this great city’s art.

 

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