Run a Turkey Trot, have a guilt-free Thanksgiving feast

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Colleen Slattery, Sports Editor

 

These runners in California got into the holiday spirit with crazy costumes.  –Photo courtesy of osideturkeytrot.com
These runners in California got into the holiday spirit with crazy costumes.
–Photo courtesy of osideturkeytrot.com

With Thanksgiving quickly approaching, exercise is the last thing on many students’ minds. Instead, students are dreaming of turkey, stuffing, gravy, mashed potatoes and pie. America is obsessed with eating during the holiday season, and Thanksgiving is the perfect start to the month of feasting that ends on New Year’s Day.

Despite this, America has recently begun to realize that perhaps there should be some healthy attitudes and practices thrown in to balance out all the cookies and candy. This is how the Turkey Trot first came about.

“Turkey Trot” is the title given to any race held on Thanksgiving Day. It can be anywhere from five kilometers to a marathon in length (though cases of the latter are very rare). A Turkey Trot it a great way to start off a day of feasting, burning some calories and racking up endorphin counts before the stress of a day in the kitchen.

In many cases, the races are held to benefit charities, such as soup kitchens or shelters for the homeless. If you participate in a Turkey Trot for charity, your sacrifice of time and effort might help to feed others on a day that centers on food and family.

Costumed Turkey Trot participants brave the cold in a race in Washington. –Photo courtesy of Inside Bainbridge
Costumed Turkey Trot participants brave the cold in a race in Washington.
–Photo courtesy of Inside Bainbridge

Turkey Trots can be comprised of a few dozen people to tens of thousands. Interestingly, Dallas’ annual Turkey Trot is one of the largest in the nation, boasting about 25,000 racers annually; such popularity is likely due to the size of the city and the nice weather in Dallas during the Thanksgiving holiday.

The Dallas Turkey Trot began in the 1940s; it is generally run on an eight-mile course, but there is also a five-kilometer walk for those who want something a little more manageable. The course was originally located in Fair Park, but it was relocated to downtown Dallas in 1979.

Another fascinating aspect of this race is that it admits wheelchair racers.

If you will be in the area this year, you should consider running it. I promise it will make the turkey and stuffing taste better; what better condiment is there than fresh air and exercise?

 

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